Stormwater Management

Stormwater management consists of the planning, maintenance, and regulation of facilities which collect, store, or convey Stormwater as well as managing the quantity and quality of stormwater.

 

Contact Staff

Phone: (701) 328-3486
Email: Contact Stormwater Section
rain storm

 

 

Resources

Training and Education

Past Training
Stormwater Poster pdf file

 

Manuals and Publications

NDDOT Erosion & Sediment Control Handbook pdf file
Provides the information to properly install, maintain, and implement a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP).
Initial Stormwater Pollution Prevention Evaluation Checklist for NDPDES Permits pdf file
Checklist to ensure that contractor's SWPPP is adequate at the beginning of the project.

 

Stormwater Runoff

What is Stormwater runoff?

Stormwater runoff occurs when precipitation from rain or snowmelt flows over the ground. Impervious surfaces like driveways, sidewalks, and streets prevent Stormwater from naturally soaking into the ground.

 

Why is Stormwater runoff a problem?

Statewide, the North Dakota Department of Transportation (NDDOT) operates and maintains highways, rest areas, maintenance areas and a number of other impervious surfaces. As Stormwater runs off these impervious surfaces and nearby properties, it can pick up pollutants like oil, fertilizers, pesticides, dirt, trash, animal waste and other debris. These pollutants – called non-point source pollutants - then flow into a storm sewer system or directly to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or other aquatic resource and can degrade the quality of North Dakota’s water resources. If left uncontrolled and untreated, Stormwater runoff can harm habitat, erode stream channels, and carry pollutants into lakes, rivers, and wetlands and the bodies of water we use for swimming, fishing, and providing drinking water.

 

In North Dakota...

Statewide, the North Dakota Department of Transportation (NDDOT) operates and maintains highways, rest areas, maintenance areas and a number of other impervious surfaces. As Stormwater runs off these impervious surfaces and nearby properties, it can pick up pollutants like oil, fertilizers, pesticides, dirt, trash, animal waste and other debris. These pollutants – called non-point source pollutants - then flow into a storm sewer system or directly to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or other aquatic resource and can degrade the quality of North Dakota’s water resources. If left uncontrolled and untreated, Stormwater runoff can harm habitat, erode stream channels, and carry pollutants into lakes, rivers, and wetlands and the bodies of water we use for swimming, fishing, and providing drinking water.

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution

What is the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Program?

As authorized by the Clean Water Act, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Point sources are discrete conveyances such as pipes or man-made ditches. Individual homes that are connected to a municipal system, use a septic system, or do not have a surface discharge do not need an NPDES permit; however, industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. In most cases, the NPDES permit program is administered by authorized states. In North Dakota, the NPDES program is administered by the North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH).

 

What is the MS4 General Stormwater Permit?

Polluted Stormwater runoff is commonly transported through Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s), from which it is often discharged untreated into local bodies of water. An MS4 is a conveyance or system of conveyances that is:

  • Owned by a state, city, town, village, or other public entity that discharges to waters of the U.S.;
  • Designed or used to collect or convey stormwater (including storm drains, pipes, ditches, etc.);
  • Not a combined sewer; and
  • Not part of a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (sewage treatment plant).

To prevent harmful pollutants from being washed or dumped into an MS4, operators must obtain a NPDES permit and develop a stormwater management program.

 

Memorandum of Agreement (MOA)

A new Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) has been developed and signed by the North Dakota Department of Transportation (NDDOT) and the North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH). This agreement is entered into by each agency to promote interagency cooperation and to define the duties of each agency as they relate to the efficient implementation of erosion and sediment control on highway construction projects in North Dakota. Changes have been made to the previous MOA and are as follows:

  1. A project area that would require a permit has been given a more clear definition.
  2. Added language explaining that work on projects that do not require a permit must be performed in a manner that does not affect water quality.
  3. Added language requiring Contractors to obtain separate permits for any contractor controlled areas.
  4. Added the requirements of the EPA Consent Agreement signed by the NDDOT on June 12, 2012. These requirements are detailed in Section e of the Memorandum.
  5. Added language to better define an erosion control failure.
  6. Detailed that only the NDDOT, not the Contractor, can file a Notice of Termination with the NDDoH to terminate a permit.
  7. Removed outdated processes that are no longer used by the NDDOT.

 

External Resources

Health Department Links

NDDoH Construction General Permit Page
MOA between NDDOT and NDDoH
NDDoH Construction General Permit
NDDoH Customizable SWPPP Template
NDDoH Integrated Reports Page
303 (d) listed waters
NDDoH Total Maximum Daily Load Page Information
NDDoH Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) Page
NDDoH (MS4) Permit
NDDoH Stormwater Field Inspection Report pdf file
Disclaimer (Field Inspection Report)
Checklist used by State Inspectors to perform Land Disturbance inspections on a permitted facility.